Technology and Ideology of Saghalien Central Experiment Station:
Imperial Science in Colonial Development of Karafuto during 1930s
The Journal of Agricultural History, (47), 2013, pp. 70-81
NAKAYAMA Taisho

This paper is concerned about “imperial science” in Karafuto, one of the colonies of the Japanese empire. This paper is one kind of techno-cultural history studies which is concerned about not technology itself but the relationship between technology and society.

The geographic characteristic of Karafuto as one of the colonies of the Japanese empire was that it was impossible to produce rice crop there generally. It was quite different from other colonies, such as Korea and Taiwan. The characteristic of “imperial science” in Karafuto under the development regime (1905-1937) has been already clarified on the paper written by NAKAYAMA Taisho in 2011. Therefore, this paper focuses on the characteristic of “imperial science” in Karafuto under the wartime regime in which every natural resource was mobilized for the war.

This paper aims to clarify the four points. The first is the relationship between the technology of Saghalien Central Experiment Station (Karafuto-cho Chuo-Shikenjo) and the wartime regime. The second is the relationship between the ideology of Saghalien Central Experiment Station and the wartime regime. The third is the relationship between the process from the development regime into the wartime regime, and the technology and ideology of Saghalien Central Experiment Station. The forth is the activities of the staffs of Saghalien Central Experiment Station after the war.

The history of Karafuto referred in this paper are divided into three periods; the first period began at Marco Polo Bridge Incident which occurred on July 7th 1937 and ended just before the incorporation into the Japanese mainland (naichi) of Karafuto on March 1943. The second period began on April 1943 and ended on August 1945 when the USSR army occupied Toyohara, the capital of Karafuto. The third began just after the occupation.

(Update: 2020.03.10)